New Eng Manager at Indeed? First: Write Some Code

I joined Indeed in March 2016 as an “industry hire” manager for software engineers. At Indeed, engineering managers act as individual contributors (ICs) before taking on more responsibilities. Working with my team as an IC prepared me to be a more effective manager.

new eng manager

Before my first day, I talked with a few engineering managers about what to expect. They advised that I would spend about 3-6 months contributing as an individual developer. I would write unit tests and code, commit changes, do code reviews, fix bugs, write documentation, and more.

I was excited to hear about this approach, because in my recent years as an engineering manager, I had grudgingly stopped contributing at the code level. Instead, I lived vicariously through others by doing code reviews, participating in technical design reviews, and creating utilities and tools that boosted team productivity.

When new managers start in the Indeed engineering organization as an IC, they can rotate through several different teams or stay with a single team for about a quarter. I was in the latter camp and joined a team that works on revenue management.

Onboarding as an individual contributor

My manager helped to onboard me and directed me to self-guided coursework on our wiki. I was impressed by the amount of content provided to familiarize new hires with the tools and technologies we use at Indeed. In my experience, most companies don’t invest enough in creating and maintaining useful documentation. Equally as valuable, fellow Indeedians gladly answered my questions and helped me to get unblocked when I encountered technical hurdles. I really appreciated that support as a new employee.

During my time as an IC, I had no management responsibilities. That was a change for me….and it was wonderful! I focused on code. I built technical competence and knocked the rust off mental processes that I hadn’t needed to use for awhile. I observed practices and processes used by the team to learn how I could become equally productive. I had a chance to dive deeper into Git usage. I wrote unit and DAO tests to increase code coverage. I learned how to deploy code into the production environment. For the first time in a long while, I wrote production code for new features in a product.

To accelerate my exposure to the 20 different projects owned by my team, I asked to be included on every code review. I knew I wouldn’t be able to contribute to all of the projects, but I wanted to be exposed to as many as possible. Prior to my request, the developer typically selected a few people to do a code review and nominated one to be the “primary” reviewer. Because I was included in every review, I saw code changes and the comments left by team members on how to improve the code. I won’t claim I understood everything I read in every code review, but I did gain an appreciation for the types of changes. I recommend this approach to every new member of a team, not just managers.

Other activities helped me integrate with people outside of my team. For example, I scheduled lunch meetings with everyone who had interviewed me. This was mostly other engineering managers, but I also met with folks in program management and technical writing. Everyone I contacted was open to meeting me. These lunch meetings allowed me to get a feel for different roles; how they planned and prioritized work; their thoughts on going from IC to manager; and challenges that they had faced during their tenure at Indeed. On-site lunches (with great food, by the way) allowed me to meet both engineering veterans as well as people in other departments.

Transitioning into a managerial role

By the time I was close to the end of my first full quarter, I had contributed to several projects. I had been exposed to some of the important systems owned by my team. Around this time, my manager and I discussed my transition into a managerial role. We agreed that I had established enough of a foundation to build on. I took over 1-on-1 meetings, quarterly reviews, team meetings, and career growth discussions.

Maintaining a technical focus

Many software engineers who take on management roles struggle with the idea of giving up writing code. But in a leadership position, what matters more is engaging the team on a technical level. This engagement can take a variety of forms. Engineering managers at Indeed coach their teams on abstract skills and technical decisions. When managers have a deeper understanding of the technology, they can be more effective in their role.

I am glad that I had a chance to start as an IC so that I could earn my team’s trust and respect. A special shout out to the members of the Money team: Akbar, Ben, Cheng, Erica, Kevin, Li, and Richard.

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